Just A Thought…

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Eternal security vs. Human responsibility…

Reformed vs. Armeniast…

For centuries theologians and some of the brightest minds to walk the earth have considered, questioned, studied, discussed and debated the doctrinal divide of eternal security or “once saved, always saved” and the seeming juxtaposition of human responsibility otherwise known as “free will”.

While I do not count myself among these great minds, there are some foundational passages of Scripture that I have been working through and have wrestled with for years, all of which have lead me to a greater understanding of what I see as human responsibility with regards to our faith and salvation.

Theological Arguments
I am well aware that there are theological arguments; that whole camps and systems of theology and even denominations, that have divided over this issue of eternal security of the believer for generations. Men much smarter than I could ever imagine or hope for in my own life have studied and wrestled and fought hard over what they have come to understand in their own lives and systematic theology. These men on both sides have education and credentials that far surpass anything that I will likely ever know. And the point that I wrestle with is that they are on both sides of the fence. Both camps. Both sets of belief carry with them amazing theologians whom love Jesus and have been used of God, by God, for God in life and ministry. These are brothers in the faith that will encounter eternity, ushered into heaven by the same God and creator of all; men that have professed Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior.

Much has been said about these
I cannot say that I have it all figured out or all correct. I would never presume that what I believe about eternal security of the believer is the only line of thinking or correct system of belief. What I can say with assurance is that I have studied God’s Word, I have wrestled hard with these theological truths and ideas, and that I have come to an understanding of what I believe based on both education and personal experience. I am continuing to work out my salvation with fear and trembling, and I am ever-aware of my need and total dependence on the Spirit of God to lead me in every aspect and area of life and faith and ministry.

As a teacher of God’s Word I know all too well the ramifications of those that teach faulty faith and doctrine. I will be held accountable before God for what I teach. With that in mind I BEG God that the words of my mouth and meditations of my heart will be holy and pleasing and acceptable in His sight – that these words will flow out of a right-relationship with Jesus and discernment from the Holy Spirit of God!

I do not profess to be Calvinist. I am not fully Armeniast. I am a culmination of great reformers and holiness theologians and preachers that have gone before me to lay a foundation of faith, knowledge, understanding, and instruction. Most important, I am a child of God doing all that I can to live out of my salvation.

I hope what I have said and what I am about to share helps a little to understand where I’m coming from and how I arrived there. It’s not the only theological position and I’m always open for healthy discussion and dialogue so long as we keep with the unity of believers and in humility, consider one another better than ourselves as we seek to both understand as well as to be understood.

So what do I believe?
In short, I do not believe that any person that has experienced prevenient grace, initial sanctification, regeneration, and is growing in their faith through progressive sanctification can ever “lose” their salvation. This person has an assurance of salvation for all eternity. No sin is too great, confessed or otherwise, to keep us from God’s love and saving grace (Romans 6:1-12), but we have a responsibility to live out and live out of our salvation.

Salvation cannot be earned; it is a gift from God alone (Ephesians 2:8).

Salvation cannot be bought; God has already paid our ransom (1 Corinthians 6 & 7).

Salvation cannot be taken from us or lost (John 10:28-29).

Salvation requires a choice (Joshua 24:14-15; Romans 10:9-10) .

Salvation, once saved, cannot be separated from God (Romans 8:38).

Salvation is reserved for our Sovereign God alone whom illuminates our minds through the power of the Holy Spirit, drawing us unto Himself, and provides us with the opportunity to respond to His invitation (John 1:9, 16:13-16; Hebrew 6:4; Ephesians 1:18; 1 Corinthians 4:5).

What I am about to share is no commentary neither are these personal feelings or my interpretation(s). Instead, what I am about to share is little more than Scripture that I have wrestled with for years and the original language with which these words were intended, which have given me more than a compelling reason to hold to the doctrine of human responsibility. Nothing more. Nothing less.

Understanding Eternal Security
One of the passages that I have heard referenced and recited to me many times over the years, specifically the last 9 months, with regards to eternal security of the believer in the reformed camp comes from the gospel of John 10:28-29, which reads:

28 I give them eternal life, and they will never perish. No one can snatch them away from me, 29 for my Father has given them to me, and he is more powerful than anyone else. No one can snatch them from the Father’s hand.

At first blush it is easy to understand how theological arguments for “once saved, always saved” come into being. It seems to me that God is saying that once he chooses us, there is nothing that we can do to lose that election. However, when we dive into the original language (Greek) as well as culture and context, there are a few key words/ideas that we need to investigate further to really try and understand.

Let me offer the same passage of Scripture with the original Greek language included:

28 I give (δίδωμι // didomi // to offer or allow // requires acceptance) them eternal life (αἰώνιος // aionios // unending and/or ageless), and they will never perish (ἀπόλλυμι // apollumi // destroy, lose, perish resulting in death). No one can snatch (ἁρπάζω // harpazo // to take by force, obtain by robbery) them away from me, 29 for my Father has given (δίδωμι // didomi // to offer or allow // requires acceptance) them to me, and he is more powerful (μέγας // megas // greater, stronger) than anyone (πᾶς // pas // every kind) else. No one can snatch (ἁρπάζω // harpazo // snatch, obtain by robbery) them from the Father’s hand.

When we take a closer look at the text it becomes clear and I would agree fully that there is no one and no thing that can rob us of or take away our salvation. However, what we must account for is the word didomi or “give/given”, which we see used twice in these 2 verses. This language denotes that God offers us this eternal life, but as is the case with any gift, it must be accepted by the recipient. In order to accept this gift, we, as individuals, have human responsibility to make that choice (“free will”) to accept God’s gift.

The other piece that many have run through is the idea that our salvation can never be “snatched” away from us. I fully agree that our salvation cannot be snatched away from us! That said, we must understand the word snatched here, in the original language, is harpazo, which means “taken by force or robbed”. Once we are in Christ, there is no one and no thing that can ever take our salvation away from us. This does not excuse our responsibility to accept this salvation and does not suggest that we have no right or ability to abandon our salvation otherwise known as apostasy. I will discuss this more as we go on.

Another passage of Scripture that comes up time and again with regards to eternal security of the believer is Romans 8:31-39:

 31 What shall we say about such wonderful things as these? If God is for us, who can ever be against us? 32 Since he did not spare even his own Son but gave him up for us all, won’t he also give us everything else? 33 Who dares accuse us whom God has chosen for his own? No one—for God himself has given us right standing with himself. 34 Who then will condemn us? No one—for Christ Jesus died for us and was raised to life for us, and he is sitting in the place of honor at God’s right hand, pleading for us. 35 Can anything ever separate us from Christ’s love? Does it mean he no longer loves us if we have trouble or calamity, or are persecuted, or hungry, or destitute, or in danger, or threatened with death? 36 (As the Scriptures say, “For your sake we are killed every day; we are being slaughtered like sheep.”) 37 No, despite all these things, overwhelming victory is ours through Christ, who loved us. 38 And I am convinced that nothing can ever separate us from God’s love. Neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither our fears for today nor our worries about tomorrow—not even the powers of hell can separate us from God’s love. 39 No power in the sky above or in the earth below—indeed, nothing in all creation will ever be able to separate us from the love of God that is revealed in Christ Jesus our Lord.

I would argue that we must look at the first 30 verses, specifically verses 4 through 16, which set up the context and show us clearly that we are not devoid of human responsibility and the necessity to make a choice. On the back end, once we have made our decision our salvation is secure from outside powers or influence to take away our salvation, but does not excuse our human responsibility.

Here are some examples of a quick word-study:

Romans 8:4 – “follow” // περιπατέω // peripateo // follow, walk, conduct my life

Romans 8:6 – “letting” // ἐάω // eao // allow, permit

Romans 8:9 – “if” // εἴπερ // eiper // result of a choice

Romans 8:12 – “obligation” // ὀφειλέτης // opheiletes // a debt owed

Romans 8:13 – “live” // ζάω // zao // to live, come alive

Romans 8:14 – “lead” // ἄγω // ago // to be lead or to follow a guide (not drug along)

Romans 8:15 – “receive” // λαμβάνω // lambano // to take hold of, accept (to choose)

Romans 8:16 – “affirm” // συμμαρτυρέω // summartureo // witness, testify

Romans 8:35 – “who” // τίς // tis // outside source

Romans 8:38 – “separate” // χωρίζω // chorizo // to separate, divide

When you take the totality of the context from Romans 8, specifically the first 16 verses, it does not excuse our human responsibility for choice but helps us understand, all the more, that when we make this decision for Christ, nothing outside of ourselves can strip this away from us. As I understand it, what Paul was telling the church in Rome was that no one and no thing can take away or strip us of our salvation. However, I can’t find anywhere in this text the absence of human responsibility and the ability for each person to make a decision based on God illuminating our mind through the power of the Spirit of God. It would seem, then, that God presents us with the truth and in his sovereign desire that we all come to salvation, but there is a choice that must be made by each individual. And once we experience this salvation, we can never lose it or have it stripped or taken from us, but we do have both the choice and the responsibility to live out and live out of our salvation.

Human responsibility in Scripture
The following are just a few passages of Scripture that I have wrestled with over the years with regards to human responsibility and what has helped to inform my theology, which is ever-growing. I have not added my own thoughts or personal commentaries. Instead, I have included original language (Greek), which has refined and shaped my beliefs.

Matthew 10:22-32 (NLT)
22 And all nations will hate you because you are my followers. But everyone who endures (“endures” // ὑπομένω // hupomeno // verb // remain, stand firm) to the end will be saved. 23 When you are persecuted in one town, flee to the next. I tell you the truth, the Son of Man will return before you have reached all the towns of Israel. 24 “Students are not greater than their teacher, and slaves are not greater than their master. 25 Students are to be like their teacher, and slaves are to be like their master. And since I, the master of the household, have been called the prince of demons, the members of my household will be called by even worse names! 26 “But don’t be afraid of those who threaten you. For the time is coming when everything that is covered will be revealed, and all that is secret will be made known to all. 27 What I tell you now in the darkness, shout abroad when daybreak comes. What I whisper in your ear, shout from the housetops for all to hear! 8 “Don’t be afraid of those who want to kill your body; they cannot touch your soul (Refer to John 10:28-29). Fear only God, who can destroy both soul and body in hell. 29 What is the price of two sparrows—one copper coin? But not a single sparrow can fall to the ground without your Father knowing it. 30 And the very hairs on your head are all numbered. 31 So don’t be afraid; you are more valuable to God than a whole flock of sparrows.32 “Everyone who acknowledges (ὁμολογέω // homologeo // verb // confess, agree with) me publicly here on earth, I will also acknowledge before my Father in heaven.

Matthew 19:28-30 (NLT)
28 Jesus replied, “I assure you that when the world is made new and the Son of Man sits upon his glorious throne, you who have been my followers (ἀκολουθέω // akoloutheó // verb // to attend, follow, accompany one’s leading) will also sit on twelve thrones, judging the twelve tribes of Israel. 29 And everyone who has given (ἀφίημι // aphiemi // verb // release, sent away, permit to depart) up houses or brothers or sisters or father or mother or children or property, for my sake, will receive a hundred times as much in return and will inherit eternal life. 30 But many who are the greatest now will be least important then, and those who seem least important now will be the greatest then.

John 15:1-8 (NLT)
“I am the true grapevine, and my Father is the gardener. 2 He cuts off every branch of mine that doesn’t produce fruit, and he prunes the branches that do bear fruit so they will produce even more. 3 You have already been pruned and purified by the message I have given you. 4 Remain (μένω // meno // verb // choose to stay, abide) in me, and I will remain (μένω // meno // verb // choose to stay, abide) in you. For a branch cannot produce fruit if it is severed from the vine, and you cannot be fruitful unless you remain (μένω // meno // verb // choose to stay, abide) in me. 5 “Yes, I am the vine; you are the branches. Those who remain (μένω // meno // verb // choose to stay, abide) in me, and I in them, will produce much fruit. For apart (χωρίς // choris // adverb // to be without) from me you can do nothing. 6 Anyone who does not remain (μένω // meno // verb // choose to stay, abide) in me is thrown away like a useless branch and withers. Such branches are gathered into a pile to be burned. 7 But if you remain (μένω // meno // verb // choose to stay, abide) in me and my words remain (μένω // meno // verb // choose to stay, abide) in you, you may ask for anything you want, and it will be granted!8 When you produce much fruit, you are my true disciples. This brings great glory to my Father.

1 Corinthians 9:27 (NLT)
27 I discipline my body like an athlete, training it to do what it should. Otherwise, I fear that after preaching to others I myself might be disqualified (ἀδόκιμος // adokimos // adjective // unapproved, failing to pass) is.

1 Corinthians 15:1-2 (NLT)
Let me now remind you, dear brothers and sisters, of the Good News I preached to you before. You welcomed (παραλαμβάνω // paralambanó // verb // to take, to receive) it then, and you still stand firm in it. 2 It is this Good News that saves you if you continue (κατέχω // katecho // verb // take possession of, bind, cement) to believe the message I told you—unless, of course, you believed something that was never true in the first place.

Galatians 5:1-5 (ESV)
For freedom Christ has set us free; stand firm (στήκω // steko // verb // preserve, hold on to) therefore, and do not submit again (πάλιν // palin // adverb // go back to, return) to a yoke of slavery.2 Look: I, Paul, say to you that if you accept circumcision, Christ will be of no advantage to you. 3 I testify again to every man who accepts circumcision that he is obligated to keep the whole law. 4 You are severed (καταργέω // katargeo // verb // abolish, separate from) from Christ, you who would be justified by the law; you have fallen away from grace. 5 For through the Spirit, by faith, we ourselves eagerly wait for the hope of righteousness.

Galatians 5:13-14 (ESV)
13 For you were called (καλέω // kaleo // verb // invite, summon, call) to freedom, brothers. Only do not use your freedom as an opportunity for the flesh, but through love serve one another. 14 For the whole law is fulfilled in one word: “You shall love your neighbor as yourself.”

Galatians 6:1-6 (NLT)
Dear brothers and sisters, if another believer is overcome (προλαμβάνω // prolambanó // verb // caught up in, a taken back) by some sin, you who are godly should gently and humbly help that person back (καταρτίζω // katartizó // verb // bring into its proper condition, return) onto the right path. And be careful not to fall ( πίπτω // pipto // verb // fall under, come under, prostrate, fall to) into the same temptation yourself. 2 Share each other’s burdens, and in this way obey the law of Christ. 3 If you think you are too important to help someone, you are only fooling yourself. You are not that important. 4 Pay careful attention to your own work, for then you will get the satisfaction of a job well done, and you won’t need to compare yourself to anyone else. 5 For we are each responsible for our own conduct. 6 Those who are taught the word of God should provide for their teachers, sharing all good things with them.

Philippians 2:12 (NLT)
12 Dear friends, you always followed (ὑπακούω // hupakouó // verb //listen, hearken to, obey) my instructions when I was with you. And now that I am away, it is even more important. Work hard to show (κατεργάζομαι // katergazomai // verb // labor, to accomplish) the results of your salvation, obeying God with deep reverence and fear.

Colossians 1:21-23 (NLT)
21 This includes you who were once far away from God. You were his enemies, separated from him by your evil thoughts and actions. 22 Yet now he has reconciled you to himself through the death of Christ in his physical body. As a result, he has brought you into his own presence, and you are holy and blameless as you stand before him without a single fault. 23 But you must continue (ἐπιμένω // epimeno // verb // remain, persist) to believe this truth and stand firmly (ἑδραῖος // hedraios // adjective // steadfast, not move away from) in it. Don’t drift away from the assurance (ἐλπίς  // elpis // noun // hope, expectation) you received (ἀκούω // akouo // verb // to hear, to listen, respond) when you heard the Good News. The Good News has been preached all over the world, and I, Paul, have been appointed as God’s servant to proclaim it.

Hebrews 6:1-6 (NLT)
So let us stop going over the basic teachings about Christ again and again. Let us go on instead and become mature in our understanding. Surely we don’t need to start again with the fundamental importance of repenting from evil deeds and placing our faith in God. 2 You don’t need further instruction about baptisms, the laying on of hands, the resurrection of the dead, and eternal judgment. 3 And so, God willing, we will move forward to further understanding. 4 For it is impossible to bring back to repentance those who were once (ἅπαξ // hapax // adverb // once for all, once knew, once more) enlightened (φωτίζω // phótizó // verb // having brought to light, illuminate, make evident, reveal) —those who have experienced (γεύομαι // geuomai // verb // to taste, having experienced) the good things of heaven and shared in the Holy Spirit, 5 who have tasted (γεύομαι // geuomai // verb // to taste, having experienced) the goodness of the word of God and the power of the age to come— 6 and who then turn away from (παραπίπτω // parapiptó // verb // to fall away, fall back (into the unbelieving and godless ways of the old time), return) God. It is impossible to bring such people back to repentance; by rejecting the Son of God, they themselves are nailing him to the cross once again and holding him up to public shame.

Hebrews 10:26-31 (NLT)
26 Dear friends, if we deliberately (ἑκουσίως // hekousiós // adverb // willingly, of one’s accord, choose) continue sinning after (μετά // meta // preposition // having already experienced, encountered) we have received knowledge of the truth, there is no longer any sacrifice that will cover these sins.27 There is only the terrible expectation of God’s judgment and the raging fire that will consume his enemies. 28 For anyone who refused to obey the law of Moses was put to death without mercy on the testimony of two or three witnesses. 29 Just think how much worse the punishment will be for those who have trampled on the Son of God, and have treated the blood of the covenant, which made us holy, as if it were common and unholy, and have insulted and disdained the Holy Spirit who brings God’s mercy to us. 30 For we know the one who said, “I will take revenge.     I will pay them back.” He also said, “The LORD will judge his own people.” 31 It is a terrible thing to fall into the hands of the living God.

2 Peter 2:20-22 (NLT)
20 And when people escape from the wickedness of the world by knowing our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and then get tangled (ἐμπλέκω // empleko // verb // enfold, entangle, get involved with, caught up in) up and enslaved by sin again (πάλιν // palin // adverb // go back to, return), they are worse off than before. 21 It would be better if they had never known (ἐπιγινώσκω //epiginóskó // verb // to come to know, understand, recognize) the way to righteousness than to know it and then reject (ὑποστρέφω // hupostrephó // verb // turn back to) the command (ἐντολή // entole // noun // ordinance, instruction, demand) they were given to live a holy life. 22 They prove the truth of this proverb: “A dog returns (ἐπιστρέφω // epistrephó // verb // come back, towards, turn back to) to its vomit.” And another says, “A washed pig returns to the mud.”

Revelation 2:10 (NLT)
10 Don’t be afraid of what you are about to suffer. The devil will throw some of you into prison to test you. You will suffer for ten days. But if you remain (μένω // meno // verb // choose to stay, abide) faithful (πιστός // pistos // adjective // believing, continued faith) even when facing death, I will give (δίδωμι // didomi // to offer or allow // requires acceptance) you the crown of life.

Revelation 3:1-5 (NLT)
“Write this letter to the angel of the church in Sardis. This is the message from the one who has the sevenfold Spirit of God and the seven stars: “I know all the things you do, and that you have a reputation for being alive (ζάω // zao // verb // to live, come alive, once have life) —but you are dead. 2 Wake up! Strengthen what little remains (λοιπός // loipos // adjective // to leave behind), for even what is left is almost dead. I find that your actions do not meet the requirements of my God.3 Go back to (μνημονεύω // mnémoneuó // verb // to remember, recall, make mention of) what you heard and believed (τηρέω // tereo // verb // guard, observe, watch over, keep) at first; hold (κατέχω // katecho // verb // take possession of, bind, cement) to it firmly. Repent and turn to me again (πάλιν // palin // adverb // go back to, return). If you don’t wake up, I will come to you suddenly, as unexpected as a thief. 4 “Yet there are some in the church in Sardis who have not soiled their clothes with evil. They will walk with me in white, for they are worthy. 5 All who are victorious (νικάω // nikao // verb // conquer, overcome) will be clothed in white. I will never erase their (αὐτός // autos // personal pronoun // specific to those that remain in Him, group of people or person) names from the Book of Life, but I will announce before my Father and his angels that they are mine.

Finishing where I started
As I stated early on, I do not pretend to have all of the answers. That is reserved for my Sovereign God alone. I’m so glad He reminds us that His ways are not our ways, neither are His thoughts like our thoughts (Isa 55). Instead of trying to fit an incredibly infinite God into a finite theological box that I can understand and am seemingly comfortable with, I would much rather live out my salvation rather than exhausting myself with whether or not I can ever lose my salvation.

There is too much at stake for us to get caught up in and divide over non-essential theological arguments. Instead, what would happen if we studied to show ourselves approved and looked to grow in God’s grace and our understanding so as to honor Him and not try to please and/or cause division amongst men?

These are just some humble thoughts from a Pastor in process.

In Humility,

A. Anderson

 

Finding Focus

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Finding focus, at least in my experience, is hardly easy when you’re inundated with distractions. When things are seemingly coming at you from every nook and cranny of life, vying for you – your schedule, your relationships, your energy, and all that takes up space in your mind, it can become overwhelming and cause us to lose focus on what matters most.

Brad Smith is one of my favorite teachers of all time at any level, elementary school through graduate school. My history teacher at Oregon City High School, Brad was also the girls varsity basketball coach. Not only was Brad a basketball coach, he is one of the greatest high school basketball coaches of all time.

In 27 seasons at Oregon City High School, Brad Smith compiled a record of 629 – 92Under Brad’s leadership, his teams won 26 League Titles in 27 years as well as 10 Oregon State Championships, and 3 USA Today National Championships (1995, 1996, 1997). Brad was named National Coach of The Year 3 times, was 6 time Oregon Coach of The Year smith-inducted-hall-fame.jpgand was awarded the 2012 Morgan Wooten Naismith Memorial Hall of Fame Award for lifetime achievement.

What Coach Smith accomplished throughout his coaching career is no small feat and will likely stand for generations.

Over the years I have had the privilege of having Brad as not only a teacher, but as a mentor and friend. I remember well a conversation that I had with Brad a few years ago over breakfast about what it takes to become an expert at something. He shared with me that he believed it takes more than 20,000 times or repetitions of doing something with excellence to become or to be considered an expert. The example that he gave me was that of a basketball player at the free-throw line. Brad told me that in those moments, when all of the distractions were intentionally seeking to take a player off focus, there was nothing left to coach. It was time to do. The principle here was that a player that has become an expert at free-throws will be able to rely on their repetitions and muscle memory as well as years of experience to help keep focus despite the loud noise and sensory overload that looms.

In light of what Coach Smith shared with me I see many parallels to what the apostle Peter shared with the early church that was inundated with distraction, both from around the community as well as from within the church and the importance of maintaining focus.

This is my second letter to you, dear friends, and in both of them I have tried to stimulate your wholesome thinking and refresh your memory. I want you to remember what the holy prophets said long ago and what our Lord and Savior commanded through your apostles.

Most importantly, I want to remind you that in the last days scoffers will come, mocking the truth and following their own desires. They will say, “What happened to the promise that Jesus is coming again? From before the times of our ancestors, everything has remained the same since the world was first created.”

They deliberately forget that God made the heavens long ago by the word of his command, and he brought the earth out from the water and surrounded it with water. Then he used the water to destroy the ancient world with a mighty flood.And by the same word, the present heavens and earth have been stored up for fire. They are being kept for the day of judgment, when ungodly people will be destroyed.

In his encouragement (2 Peter 3:1-7) to Christians, Peter calls us to what we call today, “muscle memory”; to remember the Word of God when the distractions of this world are coming at us. It is in remembering what God calls us to that will help us stay focused when faced with distractions.

While there are many spiritual disciplines and practices designed to help the believer in living out their faith regardless of the noise, there is no replacement for repetition in God’s Word! It is imperative that we have a working knowledge (the greek word: epi-gnosis  //  active, experiential or first-hand know how) of God’s promises and instructions as well as an active relationship with Jesus!

On Sunday I shared a message entitled, “Remember”; a message from our Live it Up! series. If you’re interested in hearing more about the importance and power in keeping focus as a Christian in a world filled with distractions seeking to pull us away from our focus, check out the video below.

DON’T GET ME WRONG…

misunderstand |ˌmisˌəndərˈstand |   //  New Oxford American Dictionary

verb (past and past participle misunderstood) 

Example A: fail to interpret or understand (something) correctly: he had misunderstood the policeman’s hand signals | [no object] : I must have misunderstood—I thought you were anxious to leave.

Example B: fail to interpret or understand the words or actions of (someone) correctly: don’t misunderstand me—I’m not implying she should be working | (as adjective misunderstood) : he is one of football’s most misunderstood men.

What is it?

What is it about how when someone shares something, it can be so easily misunderstood?

Having taken enough Psychology courses throughout my days in college, I’m far from an expert in the subject but do know enough to understand some pretty significant ideas, and how one receives information compared to how it was intended by the giver of information almost always boils down to an individual’s personal perspective. In other words, each one of us receives information based on our own perspective and that perspective almost always becomes our reality

While I understand that each one of us is a bi-product and culmination of past experiences and education and personal preferences and vested interests, it never ceases to amaze me how in a room of 10 people whom all receive the same information, you will end up with so many variations of what was said and intended.

Yesterday…

Yesterday I had the awesome privilege of preaching – a responsibility that I do not take lightly – the opportunity to share what I hope was nothing more than a Holy Spirit led understanding and insights of a incredible passage of Scripture (1 Peter 2:11-12 / see below). As a Pastor and teacher, I am privileged to be able to share my God-given gift and look forward to it week after week. There is something about that “ah-ha!” moment in my life and in the life of people who encounter God through the active, living Word for me that never gets old. It’s to that end that I do all that I can to study and prepare myself to share with accuracy, with authenticity, and with relevance. In the end, no matter how much preparation I put in, what I have to offer will never suffice – it will never be enough. Simply put, I beg God week in and week out to redeem my energies, efforts, studies, and preparations, and to use my efforts for his good and his glory. Without the Spirit of God showing up and meeting us where we are at, changing the composition of our hearts, what I have to offer is little more than an informational and motivational understanding of Scripture. On the other hand, when we allow God to move in our heads and hearts, it changes everything!

Keeping It Real!

“Keeping it real” is a term that was grossly overused when I was in college (early 2000’s).

“Hey! I’m just keeping it real.”

The intended meaning behind this statement was to suggest that what someone was speaking was the truth regardless of what was expected or heard or how you felt about it. They were being true to themselves regardless of the outcome. While I am taken back to a space and time which included bad haircuts and boy bands when I hear this statement, there is a beautiful intention behind this statement that I deeply appreciate.

However well-intentioned sharing the truth in love is, there is always potential for people whom are receiving information to grossly misunderstand and even misrepresent what is being shared. Yesterday in my sermon was one of those keeping it real moments for me.

Don’t Miss This!

Don’t miss this! If I had a dollar for every time my Communication Prof said this to me and my fellow classmates in college, it would cover my Chick-fil-A habit for quite a while.

The point of my professors encouragement was for us to lean into what he was saying and to be aware, to not allow our personal experiences, prejudices, and preferences to take away from the intended truth that he was about to share with us. It was brilliant and readied us to listen to what he was intending to say rather than what we wanted it to mean. We learned how to ask clarifying questions in order to truly understand what he was intending and it made a platform for us to be intentional in listening to what he was about to share.

I want to share a don’t miss this moment from my message yesterday.

7 minutes

47:24 = 47 minutes and 24 seconds. This is how long my message was to our church yesterday. Forty seven minutes and twenty-four seconds.

Of these 47 minutes and 24 seconds together, 7 of these minutes consisted of me sharing passionately about perspectives and priorities. Now there was a whole lot more to the message and I will share that with you in a bit for those that are interested in hearing more, but 7 minutes or less than 0.16666666666 (one/sixth) of my message was an impassioned plea for our people to lean in and listen up as I shared about perspective(s) and priorities(s) specific to the ministry of our church, though certainly not a unique concern for us alone.

The irony of this for me as a communicator is that there will inevitably be those that missed the other 40 minutes and 24 seconds of the message all together. That’s not to say that they didn’t hear it to begin with, but 35:00 minutes into my message, at the point where I passionately and intentionally sought to keep it real with our church, all else ran the risk of being forfeit to personal perspectives and realities based on people’s past experiences, bias’, education, and feelings. The ironic part of all of this is that what I shared (illustration), wasn’t even the point of my impassioned plea.

All 47 minutes and 24 seconds of my message was a culmination of 2 verses from the book of 1 Peter:

11 Dear friends, I warn you as “temporary residents and foreigners” to keep away from worldly desires that wage war against your very souls. 12 Be careful to live properly among your unbelieving neighbors. Then even if they accuse you of doing wrong, they will see your honorable behavior, and they will give honor to God when he judges the world.

I spent the first 35:00 minutes walking our church through several incredibly important ideas and understandings from these 2 verses, including:

  • Dear friends – Peter’s use of endearment as he addresses both Jews and Gentiles on a very personal level through the lenses of his own persecution and understanding their current plight.
  • Warning – Peter’s incredible reminder to his fellow Christians not to get caught up in their new context and culture (the ways of this world) in their new and foreign communities, but to remember WHO’S they are and WHO they are in an effort to keep their priorities straight and focused on things not of this world, but on what is to come. In other words, we must be incredibly purposeful in where we’re investing our time, energy, and resources, and not to waste these precious commodities on the temporal things this side of heaven. It’s a bad investment with a horrible return!
  • Desires – Peter educates his fellow Christians on the obvious understanding that sin, in part or in whole, is “fun” and desirable when we are living in our flesh. He wants them to understand that there is a war being waged for their souls in an effort to encourage them to keep away from the things of this world that separate us from God.
  • Be careful – Here Peter draws out the value and importance of purpose, which also happens to be where the title of my talk (“The Potential of Purpose”) came from yesterday. By warning the early church to be purposeful in how they live their lives, he is establishing a groundwork from which they are to LIVE their lives.
  • Live among – Peter demonstrates with his words the practice of living amongst non-believers. He doesn’t establish a framework from which Christians are to live within the palatial comforts of their Christian community separate from the rest of the world (Christian tee-shirts, Christian bumper stickers, Christian jewelry, Christian music, Christian concerts, Christian conferences, Christian symbols, Christian friends, Christian greeting cards, and so on…you get the picture). HEAR ME ON THIS! I am not in any way suggesting that the above aforementioned are inherently wrong. I am not saying that we shouldn’t surround ourselves with other Christians in community and partake in these Christian activities. In fact, it’s just the opposite. I find tremendous value in these things. However, when these things become ALL that we are focused on at the risk of isolating ourselves and living exclusively, keeping the “unbelieving world” outside of our Christian bubbles, we have a problem! We are warned to keep away from the sinful, cultural norms of our society and to live amongst everyone as the example and standard of faith in action, a standard by which others can see exhibited by our actions and encounter Christ through how we live. What I am convinced of and concerned by is that we, in our Christian communities, run the risk of becoming little more than “light bulbs” trying to shine brighter than the other “light bulbs” within our churches. What Jesus calls us to is made clear in Matthew 5:16; that we are to be a light for Christ in our communities; a light which shines bright our testimony for all to see.

 

They will “see”

This is where it gets interesting. This is where I shared with our church that Peter doesn’t call us to share our faith with mere words or Christian symbols, but with our standard of living. In other words, what people see in how we live our lives might very will be the only Gospel (good news message of Jesus) that they will ever encounter. The Bible does not say that what our Christian tee-shirt says or what our Christian bumper stick reads or even what decorations we hang on the walls of our church will be the standard by which people are saved. The Bible does say that people are watching how we live our lives and that our lives will be the standard by which people come to encounter God, that as we live in such a way as to lift up the name of God, he will draw all people unto himself. This is when people will bend their knee and bow their heart to Jesus. This also happens to be where I shared a pretty impassioned admonishment to our church about priorities. Part of what I shared had to do with some complaints that a few people within the church have apparently shared with our staff and other leaders in the church as well as some anonymous notes that they have placed in the offering recently. My frustration isn’t for people’s concerns, whether I agree with them or not. Instead, my concern is for where people’s priorities are and how they are going about sharing their concerns.

My intention in sharing with our church yesterday was to draw people away from things that are non-essential, non-eternal, and to point them toward what really matters – sharing our lives of faith in such a way as to lead people to an encounter with Christ.

Rarely do I say things for “shock effect”. What I shared with our church yesterday was no exception. I wasn’t looking to be dramatic or create conflict. Instead, I fully intended for our church to hear that we need to get our priorities straight; that we need to become a church of PURPOSE; a church on purpose, with purpose, and for His (God’s) purpose!

If there is any fear (fear used loosely) that I have coming away from the message yesterday and what was received compared to what I intended to share, it is that people might be more concerned about our religious symbols and decorations on the wall, i.e, the paint color, the stage layout, the cross and other religious symbols, the bricks and mortar of the church building, their music preferences, than they are about actually living out our lives as the church. I also fear (again, term of fear used loosely) that people who received yesterday’s message may have heard me suggest that if they don’t like what we’re doing as a church or the direction that we believe God is clearly calling us to go, that they can leave our church. Instead, what I believe I said and certainly intended to communicate is that we are absolutely committed to being the church that God is calling us to be on purpose, with purpose, and for His purpose, and that this may not be the direction that someone might feel they can fully support. My challenge was for our staff and leaders to help these potential individuals find a community of believers where they can commit to doing life and ministry in a way that encourages them to grow in their faith and be active in their community. What I did not intend to say nor did I ever communicate is the idea that, “If you don’t like the direction that we believe that God is calling us to go, than you’re welcome to get out of our way and leave.” It’s really quite the opposite.

I care so much about people loving Jesus, growing in their faith, and living out the Gospel in their lives that I will stop at nothing under my leadership in our church to help us get there. It is my hope and desire that everyone in our church will see and understand our heart for life and ministry together within the church and throughout the community and that they will get excited enough to be a part of what God is doing here at our church and beyond. However, I’m not naive enough to believe that our community of Christians and our approach to ministry will be the best fit for everyone. If there is anything that we, as a church and leaders, can do to help people find a church where they can fit and flourish, I’m all about that!

 

What’s next?

What’s next? This is a question that I know some are probably wondering about and wrestling with. What will they do?

While I cannot answer this question for anyone on a personal level, what I can share with absolute certainty is that under my leadership here at our church, whether for the next 30 minutes or the next 30 years, I will lead our church to be a church on purpose, with a purpose, and for his (God’s) purpose. Under my leadership I will always seek to speak the truth in love, practice bold authenticity, teach the Word of God unapologetically and with absolute accuracy to the best of my preparations, knowledge, continued learning and abilities, and to lead in such a way as to honor God in obedience above all else. This includes the praises and criticisms of man. Though as a pastor and person I may not always get it “right”, I will always seek to bend my knee and bow my heart to God and to more fully surrender daily to God as Lord of my life and as the Head of our church.

I love you, church, and still believe with absolute certainty that you, the Bride of Christ, have the ability to be the hope of the world today as you allow God to work in you and move through you.

 

The message

If you’re interested in hearing for the first time or listening in again to what I shared with our church yesterday, below is a link to the message. I pray that the Word of God will fill not only your heads, but infiltrate your hearts and that you will encounter Christ in new and exciting ways as you not only hear but receive the Word of the Lord.

(RE)MAIN  //  Week 8  //  “The Potential of Purpose”  //  Pastor Andrew Anderson

Humbly and sincerely,

Andrew

Clearing The Way

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It’s more than possible that you’ve heard a statement like this before:

“Can’t see the forest for the trees…”

An old-adage which draws a great distinction about becoming myopic in a view, so much so that it distracts and keeps from experiencing the greater thing(s). What the statement, “Can’t see the forest for the trees…” refers to is an individual that becomes so fixated on one tree that they miss the entire forest of trees around them. They become narrow-sighted, perhaps even blinded by their own ideologies and personal preferences.

This morning while doing devotions with my 13-year old son, Kaedon, we read a passage together that ignited a conversation about people’s focus with regards to encountering Jesus, specifically in the context of local church ministry and worship services.

Tucked securely into the first part of John’s gospel, we read an encounter that John the Baptizer had with a few religious leaders of his day. Word had made it’s way throughout John’s community and into Jerusalem. Jesus’ cousin, John, was an early disciple and a change-agent for what would become known as followers of The Way. He was tasked by God with the responsibility of readying people for an encounter with Christ and had many disciples of his own that were being baptized and growing in their knowledge, understanding, and faith.

It’s here, in the midst of John with his disciples and the community at large, that we see the religious elite of John’s day sending delegates on their behalf to confront John and figure out who he was and what he was all about.

The Testimony of John the Baptist

19 This was John’s testimony when the Jewish leaders sent priests and Temple assistants from Jerusalem to ask John, “Who are you?” 20 He came right out and said, “I am not the Messiah.” 21 “Well then, who are you?” they asked. “Are you Elijah?” “No,” he replied. “Are you the Prophet we are expecting?”  “No.” 22 “Then who are you? We need an answer for those who sent us. What do you have to say about yourself?” 23 John replied in the words of the prophet Isaiah:

“I am a voice shouting in the wilderness,
    ‘Clear the way for the Lord’s coming!’”

24 Then the Pharisees who had been sent 25 asked him, “If you aren’t the Messiah or Elijah or the Prophet, what right do you have to baptize?” 26 John told them, “I baptize with water, but right here in the crowd is someone you do not recognize. 27 Though his ministry follows mine, I’m not even worthy to be his slave and untie the straps of his sandal.” 28 This encounter took place in Bethany, an area east of the Jordan River, where John was baptizing.

When I was talking with Kaedon about this passage the question that I asked him was, “What stands out to you, Paly?”. He immediately talked about John’s reflection of the prophetic message from Isaiah 40:3 before him – that this was the authority that John spoke from, not his own ideas, and that there must have been people or things in other’s way that could have been keeping people from encountering Jesus. After all, Jesus was in the crowd among them and went entirely unnoticed. I love his question and line of thinking, which also led to a great discussion about the sanctimonious religion and religious leaders in Jesus’ time and how this translates to the church and our faith today. Kaedon and I talked about how often times it was religion and her leaders that kept people from encountering Jesus. Though Jesus walked among them…they couldn’t see the forest for the trees or in many cases, simply chose not to look past their prejudice.

While I could have gone on and on with my son flexing my little theological muscles and sharing a ton of detail about culture and context and what John the Baptizer and Jesus were walking into; how these few verses would serve as a catalyst for an entire movement of God in their community and in our lives today, our conversation took on a focus of considering what keeps people from encountering Jesus in our churches today.

Here is some food for thought:

What tree are we focused on in our churches that is keeping people from seeing the forest?

In other words, what are we so fixated on in our churches today that may be keeping people from encountering Jesus?

Music?

Decor?

Chairs over pews?

Non-essential theological positions?

History and traditions?

When I think about the church; the Bride of Christ, it’s not hard for me to get as equally excited as I am passionate about being a part of a body of believers that is committed to doing church on purpose, with a purpose, and for a purpose. I have a grin jumping off of my cheeks even now as I am typing! I love the church! And I believe that Bill Hybels, Pastor of Willow Creek Church and Founder of The Global Leadership Summit, said it best a few years ago when he said, “I believe that the local church is the hope of the world today.”

If…

If the church is the hope of the world today…

If our responsibility as leaders in the church is to create intentional opportunities for people to encounter Christ through the church…

If our privilege is to pray for people and to purposefully meet them where they’re at while inviting them to come and encounter Jesus with us through the church…

Why would we, in the church, ever allow ourselves to fixate on one tree, in turn, keeping others from seeing the forest that is Jesus?

Rupertus Meldenius, a 17th-century theologian and educator, made even more famous a quote from Archbishop Marco Antonio de Dominis, when he quoted these words…

“In essentials, unity; in non-essentials, liberty; in all things, charity.”

And it was under the leadership of pastor, theologian, and author, John Wesley, whom took this statement and sentiment and adapted it to read…

“In essentials, unity; in non-essentials, liberty; in all things, love.”

The point of sharing a ladder of the origin of this statement is to hopefully demonstrate the value, importance, and impact of these timeless principles. While it can be easily natural for any of us to take a myopic approach to things that we find a particular affinity and great appreciation for, it’s imperative that we never allow our preferences to keep ourselves, let alone anyone else, from encountering Jesus, and especially within the church.

When it comes to sound doctrine – biblical and eternal issues – these core convictions can never be up for discussion. We must stop at nothing to hold tight to the teachings, mandates, and clear direction of God. However, beyond these core convictions, we must be careful not to divide based on our prejudices.

I once had a friend and seminarian say, “When it comes to our faith, there should be a lot of theological and doctrinal positions that we discuss, some that we debate, but very few that should ever divide us.” In complete agreement with this statement, it pains my heart immensely to hear about, see, and even know far too many churches that have lost their effectiveness and ability to minister to whole communities because of leaders in the church that have decided it was more important to fixate on the non-eternal trees rather than hold tight to what matters most and consider how we might best introduce people to Jesus whom is right here in the midst of our community.

I guess my hope for a quick reflection this morning has morphed into a bit of a rant, but I would really like for it to be seen as an impassioned plea.

My passion and commitment as a person whom is committed to the work of the local church and as a pastor with great responsibility to lead within the church is to be known for my purpose – for my commitment to purpose – for being a part of a movement within the church that does church…

On purpose!

With purpose!

And for His purpose!

I don’t ever want to be the community like in John’s time where Jesus is standing in and amongst us, yet we are unable to recognize His presence given our preconceived ideas and/or faulty and selfish expectations. I fear for the day that any church I have the privilege to be a part of or lead will become so stuck on a tree that we miss the forest entirely.

Instead, it’s my desire to be a part of a movement that is the church; ever-intentional and always strategically creating opportunities for people to encounter Christ devoid unnecessary distractions and fixated religion. I want to be a part of a church so committed to creating opportunities for people to encounter Christ with relevance and excellence that they will stop at nothing to be used as conduit for Christ; a church that faithfully lifts up the name of God and pleads for God alone to draw all people unto Himself!

It’s to this end that I pray and am committed…

A. Anderson

What About the Waiting?!

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What About the Waiting?

There is a story in the Old Testament book of Joshua, chapter 6; a story about a man called to leadership who would be responsible for the nation of Israel – a people that had spent the 40 years before Joshua’s leadership wondering in the desert because of their actions, attitudes, motivations, and defiance toward God.

If you spent any time in Sunday School or a few summers attending a Vacation Bible School, it’s more than likely that you’ve heard this story before…

Moses is old in age. He’s at the top of the mountain where he can visually see the Promised Land that had eluded him and his people for so long. God informs Moses that he will not be the man to lead the Israelites into the land flowing with milk and honey, rather, Joshua would. Moses calls Joshua up on the mountain and gives him both encouragement and instruction. Moses then calls the nation of Israel and reiterates the encouragement and instruction that he gave to Joshua for all of Israel to hear. Moses dies. Spies go into Jericho. People are confused; afraid; filled with question. Joshua is obedient and follows through on God’s plan in expectation of receiving His promise.

Now this is only a fraction of what leads up to the story packed away in Joshua 6, but gives a good idea of the backstory and the challenges facing Joshua and his mighty men.

Well, here…I’d love for you to read a few verses for yourself, which will set up what I want to share with you:

The Fall of Jericho

Now Jericho was shut up inside and outside because of the people of Israel. None went out, and none came in. And the Lord said to Joshua, “See, I have given Jericho into your hand, with its king and mighty men of valor. You shall march around the city, all the men of war going around the city once. Thus shall you do for six days. Seven priests shall bear seven trumpets of rams’ horns before the ark. On the seventh day you shall march around the city seven times, and the priests shall blow the trumpets. And when they make a long blast with the ram’s horn, when you hear the sound of the trumpet, then all the people shall shout with a great shout, and the wall of the city will fall down flat,[a] and the people shall go up, everyone straight before him.” So Joshua the son of Nun called the priests and said to them, “Take up the ark of the covenant and let seven priests bear seven trumpets of rams’ horns before the ark of the Lord.” And he said to the people, “Go forward. March around the city and let the armed men pass on before the ark of the Lord.”

I don’t know about you but when I read this story, it’s seemingly easy to get excited because I know the outcome – I know that Joshua and his mighty army do as the LORD instructed them, and on the seventh day, the walls come down and Israel takes the land.

It’s a story of suspense and excitement; a story of an underdog becoming an overachiever. This story is one filled with so much that it’s easy to get sucked in and draw parallels from the life of Joshua and his leadership and into our lives or what we would hope our lives to be about. Valiant warrior! Leader of a great nation!! Passionately following God with reckless abandon!!!

But if you stop for just a minute:

Pause…

Wait…

Do you ever wonder what the 6 days leading up to the day of promise would have been like?

Think about it for just a moment. God is making His will and way clear. You have your marching orders. You think you know what to expect or at least you plan the best you can with an expected outcome or set of results.

And so you start out your journey with the end in mind.

But what about the waiting? What happens in the days leading up to that moment in time when Joshua and his mighty men storm the walls of Jericho and capture the promise of God?

What about the waiting?

If you stop for a moment and try to read this story through Joshua’s first-person perspective, through the eyes of the warriors that woke each day, put on their armor, gathered all of the men in accordance with God’s instruction, and made the walk around the city of Jericho, all without knowing what the full extent of the outcome would look like; what do you think would be going through their minds? What would you be going through your mind?

This is where I find myself…in the waiting…

If I were to draw any parallels from Joshua’s story, I would like to think that God is preparing me for battle; to lead a group of His people into battle, to storm the gates of Jericho if you will, and into God’s faithful promises. I am confident that God has called me to be a leader and a warrior for Him. I know like I know that He has both gifted me and been readying me throughout my life to do His good will, purpose, and plan. I can see with great vision the works that I believe He wants me to be a part of and give influence and leadership to. And I’m excited!

Yet in this moment I find myself waking each day and seemingly walking around the city of Jericho, knowing that God is preparing me for battle and looking forward to, with great expectation, what He has in store. I can see the day of battle before me. I know it’s coming. Yet I am experiencing a season in which God is calling me to wake up each day, get geared up for battle, start marching toward His leading in my life, and…

Actively wait!

I’m looking forward to overtaking the walls of Jericho in my life and ministry and I’m confident that this season is right around the corner. Until the battle horns are blown and the shouts are bellowed, my responsibility is to continue to get up each day and ready myself for what God has for me in each moment; to walk the city and, out of obedience, march with expectancy and great anticipation.

And so I march…

Actively waiting…

 

 

 

“next” – Where Do I Begin?

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Yesterday I kicked off a new series here at Illumination Church, a series that we’re calling “next”. It’s a collection of thoughts about how we process and plan out our futures and what’s next in our lives.

As the year draws to a close, people are faced with the inevitable question of “what’s next?” Attentions quickly turn toward the next calendar year and planning begins – a calendar packed full of our hopes and dreams; a calendar that tells an incredible story about what matters most to us.

What I found as I processed how people plan is really quite alarming, even tragic…

Most people make have a propensity toward making plans for what’s “next” in their lives based on their desire – family vacations, finances & potential purchases, job situations, adding a new or another child to the family, school, sports, band, etc., etc., etc.  You get the picture…and when they’re done planning things out, THEN they ask God to ‘bless’ their plans without ever once considering and or consulting God (prayer, reading, meditation, counsel), on His will for their lives.

In my message yesterday I shared my heart on this matter, which is:

When planning what’s next in our lives, we have to learn to align our desires with God’s will!

In Deuteronomy, chapter 31, there is a conversation that Moses has with the nation of Israel, which he has been responsible for, advocating on behalf of, and leading for 40 years. It’s about what’s “next” for the nation.

First, Moses instructs the Israelites to recommit their lives to God. This is a people with good intentions that lost sight of God’s intentions. Moses both reminded them of the covenant commitment between God and the nation of Israel as well as implored them to return to God.

Next, Moses goes on to share 8 promises from God regarding what was next for the nation of Israel, including:

  1. Moses won’t lead the people into the promised land
    (Deut. 31:1)
  2. The LORD will cross over the Jordan River ahead of the Israelites
    (Deut. 31:3)
  3. God will destroy the nations inhabiting the promised land
    (Deut. 31:3b)
  4. The Israelites will take possession of the land God promised
    (Deut. 31:3c)
  5. Joshua will lead the nation of Israel across the Jordan River into the land
    (Deut. 31:3d)
  6. God will hand those inhabiting the promised land over to the Israelites
    (Deut. 31:5)
  7. God will not fail or abandon the Israelites
    (Deut. 31:6)
  8. God will personally be with the nation of Israel
    (Deut. 31:8)

You can read the whole passage here.

What I love most about his passage of Scripture is how Moses aligns his desires with God’s will!

There he (Moses) is. He’s on the top of the mountain overlooking the Jordan River and CAN SEE THE PROMISED LAND! He’s right there. Everything that he has given his life toward over the last 40 years is right in front of his face. All he has to do is book it for the river, take dip in the Jordan River, and he’s there.

Instead, Moses aligns his desires with God’s will, however difficult it may have been, and surrenders what’s “next” in his life and for the nation of Israel over to God. He takes his free will and makes it obedient to God’s plans and promises. Moses doesn’t make his plans and then ask God to somehow or another ‘bless’ them. No! Instead, he fully surrenders his predeterminations and trades them in for God’s promises.

Wow!

I don’t know about you, but that would be incredibly difficult to do. Yet this is EXACTLY what we’re called to do. Each one of us in our own right; though our circumstances look different than Moses’ did from the mountain where he was standing, each of us must make the decision to align our desires with God’s will and fully surrender to what He has before us.

Is it always easy? Nope! Is it always what we want? Huh-uh!

That said, I would rather have ONE God idea than a thousand good ideas. My good ideas will perish; they’re like a vapor or a mist. But God…His will…it’s eternal!

So let me ask you. What desire(s) do you need to align with God’s will in your life today?

Here’s a great place to start:

  • Ask God to reveal HIS will
  • Pray
  • Journal
  • Don’t make plans or react until you feel confident that what you’re hearing is aligning with the will of God. You will ALWAYS know God’s will through His Word (reading the Bible), and through prayer, and through listening, and through wise counsel.

“I leave you with what James shared in the early church:13 Look here, you who say, ‘Today or tomorrow we are going to a certain town and will stay there a year. We will do business there and make a profit.’ 14 How do you know what your life will be like tomorrow? Your life is like the morning fog—it’s here a little while, then it’s gone. 15 What you ought to say is, ‘If the Lord wants us to, we will live and do this or that.’ 16 Otherwise you are boasting about your own pretentious plans, and all such boasting is evil.”
James 4:13-16 (NLT)

 

21 Day Challenge – Day 21

21 Day Challenge - Day 21

Day 21 – So go!

Scripture: John 21

First off…CONGRATULATIONS! If you’re reading this day 21 of our 21 Day Challenge, then the odds are that you’ve taken the journey through all 21 days and 21 chapters through the book of John. I know it can always feel like we’re just at the beginning of things, but don’t undervalue the commitment that you’ve put in toward growing in your understanding and in your faith. Every bit counts and believe you me, it matters!

Today’s challenge and reading parallels what we talked about on day 18. The ENTIRE story, not only from today’s reading, but throughout the book of John, is basically Jesus telling his disciples, “Hey! It’s not over!!” It’s an AWESOME picture of the grace and mercy of Jesus; how we can totally blow it, yet He still chooses us – chooses to love us…chooses to redeem us…chooses to use us. With as amazing as this is, that’s not really what I want to focus on in our last day together.

Today is the final day of this devotional. I have no idea if you’ve stuck with this every day. I don’t know if this has helped you or if you’ve done the things I’ve challenged you to do. If you’re reading this, I assume you’re at least trying…so let’s talk about what I think Jesus wants of, from, and for you and me moving forward, and I’ll sum it up in 2 words. Are you ready?!

“Follow me!”

I can almost hear your thoughts now – “That’s it?” Yep! That’s it! He wants you and me to follow. So let’s go! I don’t know where He wants to take you, but I know it will be a daring adventure.

So go!

Jesus told Peter, “If you love me, then follow me!” He might take you to dangerous places or call you to dangerous missions, but he’s saying, “If you love me, then let’s go!”

So go!

He might not show you the end or give you all the details, but…“If you love me, then follow me”.

So go!

There will be times that you’ll be filled with uncertainty and you’ll wonder if this is REALLY the way He wants us to go, but “If you love me, then follow me.”

So go!

It won’t always make sense. It won’t necessary be logical. It will certainly be scary at times. And make no mistake about it, it will be risky. Some people will scof. Others will get angry, but “If you love me, then follow me!”

So go!

I won’t promise you safety, comfort, rewards, or power. I can’t! What I can do is I can promise you this, that this will be the BEST thing you ever do and will be the ONLY decision that will have eternal consequences and impact, if you just… GO! Remember, Jesus is with you wherever you go.

So go!

As you read John 21, ask yourself these questions…

Questions

1. What area(s) of growth do I need to address as I continue to seek and follow Jesus?
2. With my commitment to follow Jesus, where is the first place that I need to go?
3. What is one thing that I can do to better follow Jesus today?
4. What questions do I have?

Prayer

Lord, I don’t know if I’m ready…but I’m willing. Please lead me and show me where I am supposed to go. I fully understand that where you lead may not make sense in this human world. Lord, make me mindful of YOUR Kingdom and not mine. Wherever you lead…I’ll go! I’m heading out today, please be with me. Amen.

Need Help?

You can e-mail Pastor Andrew with any questions about this study or the Scripture! RevAndrew1978@gmail.com